Tuesday, 10 July 2012

The Mystique behind Faberge Eggs

The first Faberge egg was made in 1885 for the Empress Maria of Russia, commissioned by her husband, Czar Alexander III by Carl Faberge. Carl Faberge was born in St. Petersburg and learned the art of fine crafted jewelry from his father, Gustav. In 1882, Carl took over his father's business in 1882. This first egg was given during the Easter season and was intended to honor the Czar's 20th anniversary of his engagement to his wife.

The Empress Maria was so impressed that she commissioned an egg for the following year. A tradition was born. In 1887 Faberge was given free reign to come up with his own designs – the only requirement was that each egg should contain a surprise.

In 1894, when the Czar passed away, the new Czar, Nicholas II continued the tradition with his wife. Interestingly, there were no eggs made 1904,1905 during the Russo-Japanese war. Overall, there were 50 Faberge eggs made for the royal Russian family, but only 42 were recovered after the Civil War of 1917.

The last two eggs made for the royal family, for 1917, 1918, were not delivered to them. They were called the Constellation and Karelian Birch

Faberge also made eggs for other customers including the Duchess of Marlborough, The Nobels, the Rothschilds, the Yusupovs, and seven eggs were made for a Russian industrialist named Alexander Kelch.

An interesting note: In 1927, Joseph Stalin had many of the eggs appraised by Agathon Faberge and sold them. A known total of 14 imperial eggs left Russia between 1930-1933. Most of them were sold to Armand Hammer, President of Occidental Petroleum and a personal friend of Lenin. Armand Hammer's father was the founder of the US Communist Party. Several eggs were also sold to Emanuel Snowman, a London antique dealer.

In "The Faberge Secret," Elise Goodwin finds a rare Faberge egg made for the Russian royal family for Christmas. That's were the fiction comes in – in real life, all the eggs made for the Imperial family were for Easter, so I put a Christmas spin on the eggs for the story. I also drew on Alexander Kelch who owned several eggs, setting up a rivalry between his grandson and the hero, Dimitri Romanov.

Question: Have you ever seen a Faberge egg? I'd love to hear about your experience.

Trivia: What was the name of the 1st Imperial egg made in 1885?

REVIEWS:
5 STARS, Celia Yeary, Author
You will thoroughly enjoy this fast-paced tale of danger, a mystery, and a satisfying conclusion. Elise and Dimitri make sparks fly!

5 Stars, Reader's Favorites
Fabulously written, the story combines elements of mystery, action, love, and tender family moments all at the right places, making a perfect fit. If you want a good story combining history, crime, and passion, "The Faberge Secret" is the book for you.

Sue Perkins, Author
The Faberge Secret exceeded my expectations. Definitely worth reading more than once. It is such a good book.

5 Hearts, Sizzling Hot Book Reviews
As the love story thicken, the suspense heightens and it won't let your eyes leave the page. I recommend The Faberge Secret to all of the romance readers. Even if you have never read romance, The Faberge Secret would be a great place to start.

4 Stars, Manic Readers
"A satisifying read."

4 Stars, Night Owl Book Reviews
The Faberge Secret is a fast paced, delightful adventure with plenty of love and adventure sprinkled in for spice.

3.5 Stars, Long & Short Reviews
"All this suspense had me flying through the pages so quickly I was able to read the book in one sitting."

BOOK TRAILER: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nf5ujOoDRXs

BLURB:
Elise Goodwin finds herself faced with danger when she learns the Faberge egg she's bought belongs to a Russian mogul, Dimitri Romanov, but is Dimitri playing a game with Elise's heart to get his heirloom back?

Elise Goodwin runs a heritage museum in Brattleboro, Vermont. She travels to Boston to buy some items for her museum at Sotheby's auction. What she acquires is a delicious surprise that would excite any curator – a Faberge egg.

Enter Russian businessman Dimitri Romanov. He goes to the auction with the intent of buying the egg only to discover that Elise is in possession of it. His dilemma? He's attracted to the petite brunette with doe-like eyes and a trusting disposition.

Complicating matters is Dimitri's rival, Gustav Kelch, who wants the precious jeweled object for his own collection. Can Dimitri protect Elise from Kelch?

BUY LINKS:
AMAZON KINDLE:
http://www.amazon.com/The-Faberge-Secret-ebook/dp/B006LTE2ZS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1324310728&sr=8-1

B&N NOOK:
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-faberge-secret-stephanie-burkhart/1105070465?ean=2940013874596&itm=1&usri=the+faberge+secret

ALL ROMANCE EBOOKS:
http://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-thefabergesecret-657577-149.html

PUBLISHER'S LINK:
http://stores.desertbreezepublishing.com/-strse-236/The-Faberge-Secret-Stephanie/Detail.bok

FIND ME ON THE WEB AT:
WEBSITE:
http://www.stephanieburkhart.com

TWITTER:
http://twitter.com/StephBurkhart

FACEBOOK:
https://www.facebook.com/StephanieBurkhartAuthor

GOOD READS:
http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4031660.Stephanie_Burkhart

YOU TUBE CHANNEL:
http://www.youtube.com/user/botrina?feature=mhee


21 comments:

  1. Hi Steph, you remind me to get this book--fascinating. Yes, I've seen Faberge eggs--you don't mention here Marjorie Meriwether Post, whose husband was ambassador to USSR I believe in the 1950s--she bought up all kinds of fabulous Russian icons, plates and eggs. They're at Hillwood--her estate in DC.Meredith

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  2. Fascinating post, Steph and I LOVED the book

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  3. Meredith, thanks for reminding me about Majorie. Do you know if the estate has done any showings or museum showing with the eggs? For me, I hope that every single egg has a owner that treasures them, values them, and respects them, for I find the beauty is truly equistite.

    Jenny, thanks for popping in. I'm so glad you enjoyed the story!

    Smiles
    Steph

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  4. don't know much about Faberge except they're worth a bit and are pretty decorated with jewels and gold and from Russia. when we lived in Turkey we collected some marble eggs, but no Faberge eggs.

    Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Tina, there's such a fascinating history associated with them and I love history, so I'm a sucker for a good egg. LOL!! You're marble eggs sound interesting. I'd love to hear more about them.

      Smiles
      Steph

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  5. I haven't seen Faberge eggs in person, only in pictures. But I must say the one on your book cover is to die for.

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    1. Awww... Maggie, that's so sweet of you to say. I hope it puts you in the Christmas spirit. Even in July.

      Smiles
      Steph

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  6. Just the name alone denotes wealth and beauty, doesn't it. No, I've never seen a real one--some fake ones, but not real. They are truly a work of beauty.

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    1. Celia, I haven't seen any in person either, but Jillian Chantel sent me a gorgeous book about the eggs and I drool over that. LOL!!

      Smiles
      Steph

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  7. Interesting post Steph. Have you seen one yourself?

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    1. No, I can't say that I have, Angela, but if you tell me there's going to be a display in CA, NV, or AZ anytime soon, I'll do my best to see it, even if I have to bring the kiddies.

      Smiles
      Steph

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  8. How interesting! And so romantic... I had no idea. :)

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    1. Patty, yes, I find the eggs not only romantic visually, but the whole story on now Alexander III commissioned the first egg - it's a love story in itself.

      Smiles
      Steph

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  9. I've never see a Faberge egg. The photos are pretty. Enjoyed your book very much.

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    1. Awww...Tami, you're so sweet.

      Smiles
      Steph

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  10. Fascinating history. I didn't know all that. No, Steph, I've only seen them in pictures, but they are very beautiful. The cover is stunning too! And the book is awesome!!

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    1. Aww...Linda, thanks. I agree - the eggs are stunning - even in pictures. I'm very pleased with the cover. I think it captures the mystique of the eggs well.

      Smiles
      Steph

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  11. Yes, I saw a marvelous museum showing of 26 Faberge Eggs plus several other Faberge pieces. It was a joint exhibition of the San Diego Museum of Art (exhibit Oct. 22, 1989 - Jan 7, 1990) and the Armory Museum, State Museums of the Moscow Kremlin (exhibit Jan 30 - Mar 15, 1990). It was the largest number of Faberge Eggs to be in one place at one time since the USSR first allowed the breakup of the original collection (as much of it as was in intact following the Russian Revolution). The Eggs were from the Kremlin's collection, the Forbes Magazine Collection, Queen Elizabeth II, The Cleveland Museum of Art, and The Matilda Geddings Gray Foundation Collection. Needless to say, security at the exhibition was very tight including No Cameras Permitted. It was truly a spectactular one-of-a-kind exhibition. Of the Eggs on display, my favorite was The Trans-Siberian Railway Egg (1900). Of all the known existing Eggs, my favorite is the Uspensky Cathedral Egg (1904).

    --Samantha Gentry

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    1. Samantha thank you so much for sharing your experience. 26 Faberge eggs all together! What a treat. Since there was no cameras did you pick up any postcards?

      Thanks for sharing your favorites with us. I'm going to look up those eggs shortly.

      Smiles
      Steph

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  12. Steph: I didn't get any postcards but I did buy the 120 page full color slick paper exhibit catalogue that included full page (8.5 x 11)color photographs of each of the Eggs at the exhibit.

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  13. Doing some research on fabergé eggs -- do you know the name of the green egg on the cover? I would love to know!

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